Workshop: An Accident of Fast Feminism—Shooting Theory

An Accident of Fast FeminismShooting Theory

Shannon Bell, Professor, Political Science, York University

The workshop will revisit Fast Feminism as a site of Virilian techno-speed, setting out a fast feminist enactment of what Paul Virilio deems the accident of art—the shift from representation to presentation. Fast Feminist art brut includes phallic-bioart performance and installation along with some avatar seduction. Fast Feminism, a feminism of affect—of intensity and influence—has taken me to shooting theory—theory-in-action. In a sense the illegitimate offspring of Fast Feminism is the evacuation of the body to philosophical/theoretical images.

 

Shooting Theory brings digital video technology and print textual theory together through imaging philosophical/theoretical concepts. The idea is to transpose Martin Heidegger’s claim regarding technology, ‘that you can’t think technology technologically,’ to the praxis of political thought. The overarching argument is that you can’t think political theory simply within language. Heidegger contended that the place from which to think technology is art. I contend that the sites in which to think, produce and enliven written theoretical textual concepts are visual images and sound-scapes that can be brought forth by digital video technology. ‘

 

Shooting Theory, an on-going project since 2007, combines the technic of digital videography with the skills of philosophical thinking, allowing this artistic endeavor to bring forth a materiality of the concept.

 

Shannon Bell is a Professor of Political Science at York University, Toronto, Canada http://www.yorku.ca/shanbell/

Bell is a performance philosopher who lives and writes philosophy-in-action.

Her books include: Fast Feminism (2010), Reading, Writing and Rewriting the Prostitute Body (1994); Whore Carnival (1995); Bad Attitude/s on Trial co-authored (1997); Subversive Itinerary: The Thought of Gad Horowitz, co-edited (2013) and New Socialisms co-edited (2004).

 

 

 

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